sign up for our newslettter

60 min In Japanese with English subtitles TBA giveaway

April 29 – May 5

Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame

view trailer

Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame

Tony Girardin / 2015, Canada-Italy
87min / Blu-ray

Director Tony Girardin will be in attendance on Friday & Saturday, selling merchandise and Q&A'ing.

Giuseppe Marinoni found his calling when he transitioned from champion cyclist to master bike craftsman. But after years hunched over toxic fumes, his passion almost killed him. Today, at age 75, Marinoni is back in top shape, and decided to attempt the world hour record for his age group, all on a bike he built with his own hands almost 40 years ago. In English, French & Italian w/ English Subtitles

"A true crowd pleaser." POV Magazine

"Quirky and uplifting." Maclean's Magazine

Showtimes:
Fri, Sun–Thur: 7pm
Sat: 5pm & 7pm


April 29 & 30, May 2 & 3

Too Late

view trailer

Too Late

Dennis Hauck / 2016, USA
107min / 35mm

A troubled private eye (John Hawkes) trawls through the belly of Los Angeles looking for a missing young woman (Crystal Reed), slowly revealing a careful web of intrigue, lies and unexpected connections. Dennis Hauck’s directorial debut is a technical marvel, a feature film shot on 35mm that tells its story in five uninterrupted takes. Hauck uses one reel for each sequence, resorting to no trick shots or edits, and then shows the reels in a non-sequential order to create a story that switches between the past, the present and the future while still making sense. It’s a brilliant device that captures the imagination from the first scene and does not let go until the credits roll.

"The cohesiveness between the film's story and the style of its telling is remarkable and announces Hauck as an emerging talent." Los Angeles Times

“Gorgeously shot… A haunting, quintessential LA caper." Thompson on Hollywood

Showtimes:
Wed 4/27 & Thur: 4/28: 645pm & 9pm
Fri 4/29, Sat 4/30, Mon 5/2 & Tues 5/3: 9pm


May 1, 4 & 5

Embrace of the Serpent

view trailer

Embrace of the Serpent

Ciro Guerra / 2015, Columbia-Venezuela-Argentina
125min / Blu-ray

At once blistering and poetic, the ravages of colonialism cast a dark shadow over the South American landscape in EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT, the third feature by Ciro Guerra. Filmed in stunning black-and-white, SERPENT centers on Karamakate, an Amazonian shaman and the last survivor of his people, and the two scientists who, over the course of 40 years, build a friendship with him. The film was inspired by the real-life journals of two explorers (Theodor Koch-Grünberg and Richard Evans Schultes) who traveled through the Colombian Amazon during the last century in search of the sacred and difficult-to-find psychedelic Yakruna plant. In Spanish, Portuguese, German, Catalan and Latin with English subtitles

Showtimes:
Sun: 430pm
Wed & Thur: 9pm


May 6 – 12

11 Minutes

view trailer

11 Minutes

Jerzy Skolimowski / 2016, Poland
83min / Blu-ray

In the span of eleven tense minutes, a whirlwind of interlocking tales of life in the surveillance age unfold in this stylish, propulsive thriller from acclaimed director Jerzy Skolimowski (Deep End, Essential Killing). In a city square in Warsaw, a sleazy film director “auditions” a married actress in a hotel room; a hot dog vendor goes about his work while concealing a dark secret; a motorcycle-driving drug runner trysts with a client’s wife; and a young man plots an ill-advised robbery. Mixing sleek cinematography with footage from webcam, smartphone, and CCTV cameras, 11 Minutes masterfully lays out the pieces of a puzzle and then brings them together in an explosive climax.

Showtimes:
TBA


May 7 & 8

Dou kyu sei -- Classmates

view trailer

Dou kyu sei -- Classmates

Shoko Nakajima / 2016, Japan
60min / Blu-ray

BUY TICKETS, $12

Rihito Sajo is an honor student who enrolled into his high school with a perfect score on the entrance exam. Hikaru Kusakabe is in a band and popular among girls. They are different kind of guys, who would have never crossed paths. One day, they started talking to each other at the practice for their schools upcoming chorus festival. After school, the two meet regularly, as Hikaru helps Rihito to improve his singing skills. While they listen to each others voice and harmonize, their hearts start to beat together. Their feelings for each other slowly elevate, then peak when least expected. Goofy yet innocent, Hikaru directly talks about his feelings towards Rihito. Hesitant at first, but Rihito gradually opens up his heart to Hikaru. Two adolescent boys - being perplexed about not only about each other, butalso about themselves - struggle and get confused; however, they eventually get to understand each other. As they start to think about college and their future, what comes to their mind in order to move forward. In Japanese with English subtitles.

Showtimes:
Sat: 3pm & 430pm
Sun: 130pm & 3pm


May 7

White Zombie

UCLA Festival of Preservation: White Zombie

Victor Halperin / 1932, USA
75min / 35mm

Restored in 35mm by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute

In a foreboding mountaintop castle an evil necromancer, attended by an avian familiar, holds a virgin princess spellbound. Guided by a wise elder, her lover storms the aerie, overcomes the hideous creatures that guard it, destroys the sorcerer and rouses his beloved from her enchantment. Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) or Sleeping Beauty (1959)? No, the Halperin Brothers’ White Zombie. The most famous horror movie from Poverty Row is nothing but a fairy tale in mufti, pegged to a jazz age voodoo vogue popularized by William Seabrook’s occult writings. At the center of it all is Bela Lugosi, giving a signature performance of Mephistophelean malevolence that, after 80 years, still rings down the corridors of time. — Scott MacQueen

Showtimes:
Sat: 9pm


May 8

The Big Broadcast

UCLA Festival of Preservation: The Big Broadcast

Frank Tuttle / 1932, USA
80min / 35mm

Restored in 35mm by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute and Universal Pictures

The Big Broadcast stars Bing Crosby in his first major role in a feature. The crooner had made his screen debut in Universal’s King of Jazz (1930) as part of The Rhythm Boys trio. Crosby later signed with Mack Sennett, starring in a string of successful musical comedy shorts. In The Big Broadcast, Crosby portrays a radio heartthrob whose perennial tardiness—caused by Sharon Lynn’s vampy Mona Lowe (a play on the tune “Moanin’ Low”)—leads a sponsor to pull the plug on the WADX station. When Mona jilts him for another man, the inconsolable (and inebriated) Bing enters a suicide pact with newfound friend Leslie (Stuart Erwin), an equally lovelorn Texas oilman. In the sober light of day, Leslie resolves to set things right by buying the radio station and preparing the next big broadcast. – Jennifer Rhee

Showtimes:
Sun: 5pm


May 13 – 19

Mad TIger

view trailer

Mad Tiger

Jonathan Yi, Michael Haertlein / 2015, Japan-USA
82min / Blu-ray

MAD TIGER follows bandmates Yellow (Kengo Hioki) and Red (Kotaro Tsukada), who have been best friends and business partners for fifteen years as the primary creative forces behind Peelander-Z. Based in New York City and described as a "Japanese Action Comic Punk Band," Peelander-Z combines performance-art and audience participation in their shows, which push the boundaries of madcap acrobatic stage antics. As part of the band, each member must adopt a different, anime-like "Crayola rock" persona and fully embrace this assigned identity in every aspect of life. Seeking his own personal fulfillment, Red announces that he will do one final tour with Peelander-Z before quitting the band. In stark contrast to his character's super-positive facade, Yellow tries his best to keep it together, while dealing with emotions of shock, betrayal and abandonment. Channeling universal stories of friendship and pursuit of happiness, MAD TIGER builds to an unexpectedly moving crescendo, appropriately befitting of Peelander-Z's cacophonous melody-making.

"10 Must-See Documentaries at DOC NYC." Indiewire

"The members of Peelander-Z unmask themselves for revealing new doc MAD TIGER... For close to two decades fans have known the band with their personas held firmly in place, their colorful costumes seldom removed, but the opportunity to meet Peelander-Z has finally arrived, and the line between artist and person is blurring." Village Voice

Showtimes:
TBA


May 14

The Crime of Doctor Crespi

UCLA Festival of Preservation: The Crime of Doctor Crespi

John H. Auer / 1935, USA
63min / 35mm

Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute

As a travesty of Edgar Allan Poe, The Crime of Doctor Crespi occupies a certain niche between Universal’s earlier literary deviancies (The Black Cat, 1934; The Raven, 1935) and American International’s abundant market-driven liberties in the 1960s (House of Usher, 1960; The Conqueror Worm, 1968 et al). Summarily dismissed by Winfield Sheehan while directing Walking Down Broadway at Fox in 1933, Erich von Stroheim was forced to subsist by cadging pennies on Poverty Row in thankless roles for Monogram and Invincible. Hungarian émigré John H. Auer summoned him to New York for The Crime of Doctor Crespi, a ragtag riff on Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Premature Burial,” filmed on a shoestring in the Bronx. It’s plot shares sexual peccadilloes with two superior horror pictures released in July, ahead of Crespi’s October bow. Eschewing the heady romanticism of Bela Lugosi’s Dr. Vollin in The Raven and the Krafft-Ebing aspect of Peter Lorre’s Dr. Gogol in Mad Love (1935), von Stroheim’s equally ruthless mad doctor appears superficially more practical. Likewise motivated by sexual desire, Crespi removes obstacles to his carnal objectives with brutal determination, savoring the sadistic destruction of his rival while offering sly solace to the conquered wife. —Scott MacQueen

Showtimes:
Sat: 9pm


May 15

Bachelor's Affairs

UCLA Festival of Preservation: Bachelor's Affairs

Alfred L. Werker / 1932, USA
64min / 35mm

Restored by UCLA Film & Television Archive with funding provided by The Packard Humanities Institute

Middle-aged playboy Andrew Hoyt, who had previously been a staunch bachelor, gets sucked into marrying a beautiful but vacuous young blond, after her older sister has expertly set the bait. Realizing pretty quickly that he is not up to the vigorous physical activity demanded by his eager 20-something spouse, he conspires with his best friend and his loyal secretary to find a new plaything for the soon to be ex-wife. Adolphe Menjou plays the self-centered playboy with his tongue delightfully deep in his cheek, knowingly riffing on his own previously established screen persona as the suave older lover, but unafraid to also exhibit the frailties of advancing age. The scenes of the California honeymoon, during which the blond energizer bunny and the world-weary lounge lizard engage in ceaselessly healthy sports activity are particularly funny. Joan Marsh looks like a carbon copy of Jean Harlow, only twice as dumb, a girl who just wants to have fun. Meanwhile, Minna Gombell’s gold-digging older sister stage manages her younger sibling’s marital career, but can’t stave off disaster when the girl falls for some fresh young Latin eye candy in the shape of Don Alvarado as a rumba teacher. Based on a play by James Forbes, Precious, that opened and closed on Broadway in January-February 1929, this unsentimental pre-Code film features some of the crispest and fastest-paced dialogue of any film coming out of Fox; indeed, its cynical tone and rhythm rivals anything produced at Warner Bros. in that period. —Jan-Christopher Horak

Showtimes:
Sun: 5pm


Coming in 2016

Also in partnership with the Northwest Film Forum, we're presenting 35mm screenings of a portion of the UCLA Festival of Preservation in May.